Marlborough House today – no longer a London royal residence. Taken in 2008. | CMallwitz - wikimedia.org - CC0.

Marlborough House today – no longer a London royal residence. Taken in 2008. | CMallwitz - wikimedia.org - CC0.

Queen Maud of Norway | Where did she come from?

Her Royal Highness Princess Maud Charlotte Mary Victoria of Wales was born on the 26 November 1869, at Marlborough House in London, UK.
By LA Dahlmann | The Evergreen Post

Marlborough House was her parents’ town residence, located a short walk away from Buckingham Palace.

Princess Maud was born into immense wealth – belonging to one of the then most powerful families in the world: the British royal family.

Maud’s parents were Edward and Alexandra; then the Prince and Princess of Wales – later King Edward VII and Queen Consort Alexandra.

Maud was half British through her father, Edward – and half Danish through her mother, Alexandra. Through both her mother and her father, Maud also had German ancestry.

Maud’s paternal grandparents were the formidable Queen Victoria and her beloved Prince Albert. Prince Albert died in 1861, 8 years before Maud was born.

Maud’s maternal grandparents were King Christian IX of Denmark and Queen Consort Louise. They were also grandparents to Maud’s first cousin and future husband, Prince Carl of Denmark.

The Norwegians chose Prince Carl to become their King Haakon VII upon their full independence in 1905 – thus also making Maud Queen Consort of Norway.

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The Norwegians | Masters at sea

The Norwegians | Masters at sea

Throughout history and well into the 1900’s, the Norwegian fjords and the often ferocious waters along Norway’s long-stretched coastline were the country’s main “highway”.

Strandsitter | A Norwegian beach dweller

Strandsitter | A Norwegian beach dweller

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